The road ahead 2017

The road ahead 2017

It's just over two weeks into 2017 and we're late to the party on posting what the year ahead looks like for MySwim. The problem has been we didn't want to create lofty resolutions that we wouldn't keep. We wanted to set goals. We wanted to make sure we had a game plan in place to reach those goals. Just like when we work with our athletes. We've come up with several goals that we think are going to push the growth of the MySwim program and help us become the premier online swim training program.

Spread your fingers increase your speed

Spread your fingers increase your speed

In competitive swimming, sometimes a tenth or hundredth of a second can make the difference between first and last place, especially in the sprints like 50 Freestyle or 100 Freestyle. This can be easily achieved just by spreading your fingers apart in your stroke. The results of a new study were presented last week at the 69th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics.

Glide and Kick

Glide and Kick

Backstroke is the one stroke I see novice swimmers always get excited for. Sure, I remember a time when that was true for me as well. Think about it, you don't need to think about breathing or some of the other magnitude of components that go into a fast Freestyle, Butterfly, or Breaststroke. You get to lay on your back, relax and just go. Of course, this is never actually the case. There are so many variables that make up a great Backstroke and we're going to cover one component of that today.

5 dryland exercises that will improve your strokes

5 dryland exercises that will improve your strokes

No matter what your skill level is in the pool, there is always room to improve your strength. I'm not talking about massive amounts of weight lifting or bulking up. I'm talking about improving your core strength. When we swim, we are constantly engaging our cores into every movement. Many novice and intermediate swimmers have trouble with this concept initially. They think that if they move their arms and legs are fast as they can or as big as they can that will get them from the start to finish in record time. As we've discussed in the past, this is never the case. Our limbs are just extensions to our true power generator -- the core.

Get over your fear of water

Get over your fear of water

Swimming can be one of the most enjoyable ways to relax and get in shape, but over half the world can't swim. This is a staggering amount of people considering over half the world is water. In 2015, there was 3, 536 drownings reported in the United States. There is just no reason for this. Learning to swim is not governed by the lack of resources to the sport. For many, it's one big factor that holds them back from learning how to swim; their fear of water. Sometimes people don't even realize it, but then they try to learn the breathing or head into the deep end of the pool and begin to panic. 

Build speed through sculling

Build speed through sculling

There is one technique that I rely on more than anything else when teaching swimmers the mechanics of swimming. It's sculling. Most sessions will have at least a few lengths of sculling, whether it's part of a warm-up, cool down or even part of the main set. Learning how your body moves, manipulates, and feels in the water is a crucial part of increasing both your speed and efficiency in the water. 

The Lochte Turn

The Lochte Turn

After a hundred years of competitive swimming, Olympian Ryan Lochte has innovated a new way to turn during Freestyle. I first noticed the new innovation while Lochte was competing for a spot on the Olympic team this past year in Omaha, but thought I was mistaken so I shrugged it off. Then I saw it again at the Olympic games and couldn't believe my eyes. 

4 Tech startups that will improve your swimming

4 Tech startups that will improve your swimming

When you think about swimming, you probably don't associate it with much in the way of technology. Some sports have relied heavily on the developments of Silicon Valley as a way to improve their sports, but swimming has just continued to glide on by. The changes to the sport over the past hundred years have been around technique, nutrition and the swimsuit. Never has it been about the technology coaches or athletes use behind the scenes. Swimming also never gets a lot of press time in the papers or online. At least not until the Olympics rolls around.